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    mason
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    Hi, My name is Martin Mason. I’m 30 years old. I have just yesterday successfully completed 14 weeks at the Gordon Moody Association. Which is a rehabilitation centre for compulsive gamblers. I ended up going on March the 8th after several major mistakes in my life. I started gambling when I was 15, in the arcades at amusement parks. Little did I know the path I was headed down. The major influence in my life that ultimately caused my self destruction was my adoption as a child. In and out of care from an early age until I was adopted by my parents when i was 8. Most adopted children live with a sense of rejection. For me this was something I found hard to deal with, and a combination of self blame and confusion stopped me from understanding any of it. I spent many years suppressing my emotions and as I reached my late teens found that gambling was far easier than dealing with issues. I think mainly is was the isolation from everything. I’m sure most will agree the moment you start to bet, nothing else matters. No thoughts as to the consequences of our actions, or the effect it may have on those we love. Gambling has lead me to some dark places, and changed the type of person I wished I would have be. Many areas of my life have been effected from gambling, including relationships, work, friendships and family. When I think back to all the situations I have got myself in it amazes me. One of the first things I realised when I arrived at Gordon Moody was I was not alone. I met several fellow sufferers. Actually being able to talk to people about my past and not be judged. Having people who understood as they have had gone through similar circumstances. It felt like a weight lifted. From the moment I stepped in the house for the first time I knew what I had to do. I had to be fully committed to what I wanted to achieve and it wasn’t just stopping gambling, finding myself again and trying to understand what had brought me here in the first place. The support I received was fantastic and i will be forever grateful for those involved. This is only the start of a new life as I know I have a long road ahead. I have made some major changes to the way I think, which has helped me become more confident as a person. I have a lot to look forward to and now feel more than ever its down to me what happens for the rest of my life. I have given myself a ten year plan to become a teacher. Its not going to be easy but I know what i have to do. I will continue to use the support around me and ensure I don’t get complacent. I’ll be updating my road to recovery once a week, so see how I’m getting on!! Love Life, Love Yourself!

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